4 Ways to Successfully Turn Your Day Job into a Side Hustle That Earns You Passive Income

4 Ways to Successfully Turn Your Day Job into a Side Hustle That Earns You Passive Income

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Find out which key moves you can make to take your side hustle passive.

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February 21, 2019 at 10:54AM

Top 10 most important powers of your SharePoint team sites in Office 365

Top 10 most important powers of your SharePoint team sites in Office 365

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Keep team members—internal and external—connected to important people and information. How? Create a group-connected SharePoint team site in Office 365 – and use it. It’s yours to squeeze as much power and value out of based on what you are trying to accomplish – which at the base level is to keep everyone informed and moving in the right direction: forward.

 

This blog is a ‘what’s possible today’ guide to best use and configure your SharePoint team site to collaborate on rich content, share reports with partners, have conversations with your team, keep track of events, manage tasks, and more—from virtually any device. You’ll find lots of visual screenshots and links to further learn ‘how to’ accomplish each important power.

 

001_Top-10-powers-team-sites_hero-site.jpgCreate a connected workplace. Share and manage content, empower teamwork, and collaborate across the organization.

On to the first important power for SharePoint team site.

 

#1 | Create a SharePoint team site in seconds

You can create group-connected SharePoint team sites in seconds. BOOM! When you create a group, Office 365 gives the group a shared inbox, a calendar, a OneNote notebook, a default place for files (the team site document library), Planner for task management—and now a modern team site with pages, lists, libraries and team news – all to help the group collaborate, communicate and move things forward.

 

002_Top-10-powers-team-sites_create-in-seconds.jpgCreate your team site in seconds, give it a name, establish the connected Office 365 group, site classification and preferred language.

Create SharePoint team sites connected to Office 365 Groups by clicking the Create site button on the SharePoint home page in Office 365 [https://tenantName.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/sharepoint.aspx]. A two-step creation wizard will fly out from the right. Step one: Enter the title of the team site, select whether the group will be public or private, choose the site classification & preferred language, and then click Next. Step two: Enter the owners and members, click Finish and you’re done. A modern SharePoint team site is provisioned and ready for use in seconds, along with all the other group apps to improve teamwork all up.

Learn more about creating a SharePoint team site in Office 365.

 

#2 | Your site, your brand

You can quickly and easily customize the look of your SharePoint site to reflect your professional style and brand. You can choose one of the default SharePoint themes and customize it as needed, choose a company theme with approved branding for your company, or use one of the classic experience designs. Site headers allow adjustment of layout options, logo and background choices. Site footers allow logo, text and links to be added to the bottom of pages. And if you wish to operationalize how sites get created, you can leverage custom site themes and site designs with powerful scripting capabilities.

 

003_Top-10-powers-team-sites_change-the-look.jpgChange the look of your site with configurable and custom site themes.

Create your custom team site. Set up a team site that suits your team best. Customize your site to make it your own – adjusting style and colors and adding logos. You can even add videos, slide shows, and more to the home page by using the out-of-box web parts.

 

Learn more how you can “change the look” of your SharePoint site in Office 365.

 

#3 | Turn on and use external sharing

If your organization performs work that involves sharing documents or collaborating directly with vendors, clients, or customers, then you can use the external sharing features of SharePoint Online to share content with people outside your organization. An external user is someone from outside your Office 365 subscription to whom you have given access to one or more sites, files, or folders. There are several ways to control which sites can share externally and it can all be tracked and reported. When you need it, let people outside your organization access only the files you want them to view, download, or share. Use your site to more efficiently share reports with partners or connect with customers so they, too, can access your shared content whether they are online or on the go.

 

004-1_Top-10-powers-team-sites_external-sharing.jpgYou can manage who can send sharing invitations to external users by limiting such sharing to members of a specified security group.

004-2_Top-10-powers-team-sites_external-sharing.jpgYou can set the default type of link – and the permissions for that link – that shows when users select Get a link to share documents and folders.

004-3_Top-10-powers-team-sites_external-sharing.jpgWhen you choose to allow users to share outside your organization, you have some additional ways to allow or limit sharing.

Quick personal work story:   and I set up an internal, private group-connected SharePoint team site to use as we plan and execute on The Intrazone podcast for our bi-monthly episodes. We work with our core production team (long-term external vendors), each guest of the show (both internal and external to Microsoft), and ourselves. This means we all gain access and can share planning notes in our OneNote, chat via Microsoft Teams, review pre-published audio, build out per show graphic assets – and we use the SharePoint team site as our front door to anyone in the company to learn more about the show (this is set to view-only to the everyone at Microsoft AAD attribute); and it’s associated to our SOY (SharePoint – OneDrive – Yammer) hub site – check it out below.

 

004-4_Top-10-powers-team-sites_external-sharing-Intrazone-team-site-MSIT.jpgThe Intrazone group-connected SharePoint team site within the Microsfot Office 365 tenant – used for internal external collaboration across all episodes.

Learn more about external sharing for SharePoint in Office 365.

 

#4 | Connect your existing team site to a new Office 365 group (groupify) and add an instance of Microsoft Teams (teamify)

If your SharePoint team site does not yet have super powers from other integrated apps – you’re near-literally two clicks away – one click to groupify, one click to teamify. Be a two-click wonder – and become a team hero!

 

Groupify | Modernize your existing SharePoint team sites by connecting them to new Office 365 groups. If your site is not yet group connected, you’ll see Connect to new Office 365 group in the gear icon menu in the upper-right of your site. Click it, and step through an easy set up wizard – like if you’re creating a new SharePoint team site from SharePoint home as described above.

 

Being able to connect an Office 365 group to an existing SharePoint site is important if you want to modernize that site and provide additional group capabilities to all team members. In addition to using modern pages, lists and libraries already available in your classic sites, once you have connected your site to an Office 365 group, it can benefit from all other shared group-connected apps such as Outlook for a group inbox and calendar, Planner for task management, OneNote for team meeting notes and more.

 

005-1_Top-10-powers-team-sites_change-groupify.jpgSelect "Connect to new Office 365 Group” to connect an existing SharePoint team site to a new Office 365 Group.

Teamify | Create a Team for your group-connected SharePoint team site. If your group-connected team site is not connected to Microsoft Teams, the hub for teamwork, then it’s just one click away with the new Create a Team button that appears on the bottom-left corner of your site (you can dismiss this, and it will go away once you’ve teamified). The next top most important power (#5) dives into all the things you can do with SharePoint inside of Teams post teamification. 😊

 

005-2_Top-10-powers-team-sites_change-teamify.jpgCreate a Microsoft Teams team that integrates with your SharePoint team site.

So groupify and teamify today; find the joyify in working better together. Learn more about connect a classic SharePoint team site to a new Office 365 group. Learn more about how to create a Teams instance for a SharePoint group-connected team site.

 

#5 | SharePoint + Microsoft Teams FTW!

Now, once SharePoint and Microsoft Teams are connected – the collaboration world is your oyster with pearls a’plenty. SharePoint connects the workplace and powers content collaboration. Microsoft Teams is the hub for teamwork. Together, SharePoint and Teams are greater than the sum of their parts. You can accomplish use cases beyond file sharing, including shared news, lists, and apps – all with the ability to have a side-by-side chat and easy sharing across the team – all within the Teams user interface.

 

006_Top-10-powers-team-sites_SP-plus-teams.jpgEasily add and access SharePoint content as tabs in Teams – SharePoint files, lists, pages, news and more – even the main team site home page as shown above.

When you share and work together, you need the tools and digital workspaces to communicate, access data, and stay productive. SharePoint is the content service that powers the Files experience in Teams. You can easily add additional document libraries as tabs in Teams (there is a document library tab to do this when you add a tab "+"). You can add SharePoint lists and pages as tabs in Teams (there is a "SharePoint" tab you can add "+" that then shows available lists and pages you can choose from). And to have your team news automatically trigger discussion in Teams, use the SharePoint News connector for channels to have team news flow directly from SharePoint (even when you publish news on the go from the SharePoint mobile app) into the Teams Conversation tab. It, too, is possible to add full sites (team sites, communication sites and hub sites) as tabs in Teams using the Website tab "+".

 

And the last thing to be clear on is that all the above capabilities bring SharePoint content in with full fidelity and feature sets intact as a view into the content – not a copy of it.

 

Learn more about how SharePoint + Teams powers teamwork in Office 365.

 

#6 | Associate your team site to a SharePoint hub site (dare we say “hubify”)

As business goals and team structures evolve, so too must your sites and the content that lives within them. Associating sites together in a hub site enhances discovery and engagement with content, while creating a complete and consistent representation of your project, department or region. SharePoint hub sites provide an important building block for your intranet. They are the "connective tissue" you use when organizing families of team sites and communication sites together. Office 365 admins establish hub sites. Once established, it’s then a two-click process to associate a team site to a hub site. You then have common navigation between sits, a consistent look and feel, search scoped to content across all associated sites, and roll up of news, events and activities. And just as easy to move a team site from one hub site to another.

 

007_Top-10-powers-team-sites_hubify.jpgA SharePoint team site can easily be associated to a hub site.

Learn more about planning for SharePoint hub sites in Office 365.

 

#7 | Send your first team news article

Extra, extra, read all about it! Keep your team up to date! And do it in a way that’s easy for anyone to consume and stay engaged. With SharePoint pages and news articles, you create data-rich announcements and reports that look great on any device and within other apps and sites – like Microsoft Teams and news roll up to SharePoint hub sites – all filled with content from inside and outside (News links) Office 365.

 

Read and create news. Stay in-the-know with personalized news delivered in SharePoint home and the SharePoint mobile apps. And publish news to your teams right from your device while you’re on-the-go. It’s truly a personalized news distribution service throughout your intranet.

 

008_Top-10-powers-team-sites_team-news.jpgA content-rich SharePoint team news article publish into a group-connected team site that is associated to a hub site.

Learn more how to create and share news on your SharePoint sites. I also created a short 4min30sec “use SharePoint news” video.

 

#8 | Take team meeting notes in the team OneNote notebook

Share the responsibility of taking notes. Note taking takes a village and it’s easy to do. OneNote is great for gathering ideas, research, and information – and it’s super simple to use the group-connected OneNote notebook available by default. This OneNote notebook is stored with the group-connected SharePoint team site (within the default Site Contents > Site Assets library); it’s easily accessed as one of the default left-hand navigation items, listed as Notebook. Click this nav item and it opens the OneNote Online experience – which is then one click away from opening it in the OneNote desktop client. Once you’ve done this, you can then access it anywhere you have installed the OneNote app (Window, iOS, Android, & Web). And if you share who takes notes across meetings, the note taking burden lessens and the overall value of always having your notes goes way up!

 

009_Top-10-powers-team-sites_OneNote.jpgEvery group-connected team site store the team OneNote notebook, found in the default Site Assets library and accessible as "Notebook" within the left-hand navigation.

Learn more about taking notes in OneNote.
Also, download and install OneNote to all your devices – for free.

 

#9 | Planner integration – the new Task list for SharePoint in Office 365

Task management is most efficient when your team has access to everything it needs in one place. And hey, SharePoint can help with that – and it’s the basis of Office 365 Groups. Add in Planner and now we’re talking – tasks and content in the same place.

 

You can do this in two ways. First, if a Planner plan already exists, you can bring it in using the Planner web part. This allows you to bring in an existing plan in the context of other information on the page. Depending on what task information you think is most relevant to your team, you can choose between the Planner Board or Charts view to appear on your page. And second, you can create an entire new plan directly from within SharePoint. The “+New” button includes the option to add a Planner plan – like adding a new page, list, library or news. You can add the plan to your left-hand navigation so your whole team can access it with a single click. Sound like a good plan for a plan (or two)? Yes. Now go try it and check it off your new task list.

 

010_Top-10-powers-team-sites_Planner.jpgAdd a Planner Plan from within SharePoint in Office 365 (click New > Plan) [as shown above], or you can use the Planner web part within a section of a page or news article.

Learn more how to use the Planner web part. Learn more about creating a Planner plan directly from within the SharePoint team site.

 

#10 | Create team-oriented business solutions that blend lists, libraries, PowerApps and Flow

Collect and manage data. SharePoint lists collect data, just like you might collect information in Excel. Lists enable you and your teams to gather, track, and share information within SharePoint libraries. With SharePoint lists and libraries, Microsoft Flow, and PowerApps, you can create rich digital experiences with forms, workflows, and custom apps for every device. And don’t forget, you can now bring a SharePoint list – in its full fidelity – into Microsoft Teams as a tab. It’s truly a thing of beauty.

 

Automate repetitive tasks. Transform your business processes—from simple tasks like notifications and approvals to complex operational workflows to accelerate productivity. Use the simple, visual designer in Microsoft Flow to lay out the steps. You can do everything in Flow from configuring alerts and approvals to modeling complex, multistage processes.

 

011_Top-10-powers-team-sites_PowerApps.jpgPowerApps can also be consumed from a user’s mobile device or can be embedded into a SharePoint page (as shown above).

Learn more about building and configuring numerous types of business solutions.

 

BONUS POWER: SharePoint mobile apps

Now that you’ve considered (and tried 😊) the top 10 most important powers of your SharePoint team sites in Office 365 – it’s time to bring it home with the reality that we’re all mobile and need to stay connected and productive even when on a smaller device. Imagine, your entire intranet in your pocket. That is a lot of access on the go. The SharePoint mobile app is a new way to reach intranet content on your devices – and engage on it. You can read and write news, navigate sites, search for people and content throughout your organization, and learn through others with the powerful people cards; my favorite way to look up and learn about someone here at Microsoft; I can see who they report to and where their office is, what they are working on (that I have permissions to view) and who they work with.

 

012_Top-10-powers-team-sites_SP-mobile-app.jpgThe SharePoint mobile app is designed for those in-between moments. The people you’re connected to, the content you find, access and share, and the news you need are always nearby.

Download and install the SharePoint mobile app (iOS, Android & Windows Mobile).
Learn more about the
ubiquitous connectivity, productivity, and the rise of the SharePoint mobile app
.

 

Try more and more of what SharePoint offers, and let us know what you think

In all, we encourage you to build out and organize your sites, your intranet – the way you want them to be consumed in context of your content. As you progress year over year, keep creating and sharing structured, easy-to-navigate content, sites, and experiences to your audience.

 

Visit support.office.com to learn more on how to collaborate with team content using SharePoint team sites in Office 365. And learn more broadly what SharePoint can do for you in the SharePoint help center.

 

We want to empower you and every person on your team to achieve more. Let us know what you need next. We are always open to feedback via UserVoice and continued dialog in the SharePoint community in the Microsoft Tech Community —and we always have an eye on tweets to @SharePoint. Let us know.

 

—Mark Kashman, senior product manager for the SharePoint team

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February 22, 2019 at 06:42PM

Getting to know the Windows update history pages

Getting to know the Windows update history pages

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At Microsoft, our vision for transparency is what drives us to create extensive documentation for every audience. We believe our documentation should reflect the needs of our customers and range from “get started” guides for our various products and solutions to guidance around specific issues that customers may encounter—for example, when updating Windows devices to solve stability issues and protect against the latest security vulnerabilities. While we’ve talked about the guiding principles for monthly Windows 10 quality updates, it’s important to know that we have specific documentation on what is included in each of those updates and why and how you should install them.

That documentation can be found on the Windows 10 update history page. Despite what the name suggests, the update history page is not a single page, but rather a collection of pages, one for every Windows update we release. Each page offers detailed information about each update, such as the type of update, which operating system versions it affects, improvements and fixes and how to get the update.

Whether you are an IT pro responsible for your organization, or a consumer working with your personal device, we recommend that you bookmark the Windows 10 update history page as there you’ll be able to:

  • Learn about the latest improvements and fixes included in the update.
  • See if an update resolves an issue that may have affected your experience.
  • Understand why your device isn’t receiving the latest and greatest Windows update.
  • Find out proactively if there are known issues associated with an update and see if there is a workaround and timing for resolution.

Using the Windows 10 update history page

Finding the Windows 10 update history page is easy. You can bookmark the direct link to the page, or search for “Windows 10 update history page” on the web.

When you first arrive on the Update History page, you will see a view much like this:

Windows 10 update history page

To find the “home” page for a specific version of Windows (e.g. Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019), look at the list located on the top left. If you’re looking for details about that feature update, you can skip the rest of the steps; you’re where you need to be. If you’re looking for information about a specific quality update; however, simply select the desired update from the bottom left.

How to find details on feature and monthly updates

Windows 10 version “home” pages

Beginning with Windows 10, version 1809, we incorporated active tracking of known issues into the Windows 10 update history “home” page for each version. This information includes:

  • Compatibility blocks. Certain hardware configurations may inhibit a successful upgrade due to compatibility issues which must be resolved.
  • Issues under investigation. Whenever open issues change, or new issues are identified, they can be found here along with their current status

These pages also contain notices, pointers to product roadmaps, FAQs, and other relevant information regarding other Microsoft products, such as Surface or Office 365.

Monthly quality update pages (aka “release notes”)

The monthly quality update pages, or “release notes” for short, contain information pertaining to the content of each quality updates, including:

  • Improvements and fixes. While not an exhaustive list (as each update can often include more than 100 fixes), you’ll find information on fixes that solve high impact issues.
  • Known issues. When there is an issue that may impact users should they install an update, we offer details on these issues to help you determine whether it’s in your best interest to install the update or wait for the update containing a fix.
  • How to get the update. We link to the installation packages from the Microsoft Update Catalog and offer relevant information about installation as well as a link to a list of all altered files in that update.

History of the Windows update history page

Prior to our decision to provide Windows as a service, updates came in the form of a single patch solving a single problem. While this model allowed administrators to pick and choose which problems to solve and, therefore, prioritize testing more relevant patches, it resulted in a growing divide between the devices we tested internally (which had all of the latest patches installed) and the device used by our customers (which had a variety of patches installed or not installed). This fragmentation leaked into our documentation. Each individual patch had its own Knowledge Base (KB) article, creating a large quantity of patch-related pages and making it difficult to find the KB article for a specific patch. With the implementation of Windows as a service, we have been able deliver a single article covering all fixes and improvements in a given update, reducing redundancy and making it far easier for you to find and search for the information you need.

After the first few cumulative updates for Windows 10, we received positive feedback on consolidating the information we offer around updates and made the decision to bring our learnings to legacy operating systems. We started by creating Security-only Updates and Previews of Monthly Rollups for Windows 7, utilizing a similar packaging method to that used for Windows 10. This allowed us to, in turn, vastly simplify our documentation and eventually create an update history page for each currently supported version of the Windows operating system:

Little known facts about the Windows update history pages

Now for a few interesting facts:

  • The Windows Update history documentation is localized in 36 languages, and garners extensive use: the Windows 10, version 1809 page alone presently has over 1 million-page views and counting!
  • On average, Microsoft releases 58 new or updated articles a month for the Windows platforms. We coordinate with other Microsoft teams to share best practices that will help ensure that the information we provide is accurate and consistent for our customers.
  • Users can provide feedback on the update history pages and Microsoft will take action on that feedback.

We’re listening. Actively.

We read every comment you leave on our update history pages. Your feedback is critical to helping us build a better product and experience for our customers.

Here are a few of our recent comments:

  • “I’m 85 and I’ve been able to get rid of the blue screen but now my cursor freezes up what do I next?”
  • “Current update is taking over 30 minutes, & computer is still 0% complete”
  • “I have latest iCloud and latest Windows 10. Using Office 365 Outlook, I still cannot sync my calendar and contacts.”
  • “After the last update to windows 10, everything worked great as if it was a completely new install. The next day when I restarted my computer it reverted to the way It was before the update where some programs would not start.”
  • “Nothing to do, everything is perfect”

Examples like these help us identify trends and build better documentation. Further, it allows us to pass along this feedback directly to our engineering and customer support teams such that they can use this information in their planning processes, and to improve your experiences with future updates and versions of Windows.

We appreciate your comments and hope that you will continue to leave us actionable feedback. To leave us comments, simply click the Yes or No button at the bottom up the update history page and you’ll see the following:

how-can-we-improve.PNG

What’s next?

We are always looking to improve our experiences, and our documentation experience is no different. We are currently looking at new ways to present data that’s more relevant to the way that you use Windows. For instance:

  • Adding a section that specifies the value for each monthly update so that you are aware of the benefits in consuming each update.
  • Exploring how to better provide updates on known issues so you can more easily identify when workarounds are available, or when they have been resolved.

More importantly, though, we’d like to hear from you. How can we improve our transparency further? If you currently use the update history pages, how do you use them? If you haven’t used them before, how can we make them a more compelling resource?

If you have the time, please complete the relevant survey below. We look forward to your feedback and are excited for the opportunity to improve your update experience.

take-the-survey.png

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February 21, 2019 at 09:40PM

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18841

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18841

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Hello Windows Insiders, today we are releasing 20H1 Build 18841 to Windows Insiders who have opted into Skip Ahead. Remember – these builds are from the 20H1 development branch. Some things we are working on in 20H1 require a longer lead time. We will begin releasing 19H2 bits to Insiders later this spring after we get 19H1 nearly finished and ready; once 19H1 is “nearly finished and ready” we’ll also use the Release Preview ring for previews of drivers and quality updates on 19H1.

IMPORTANT: As is normal with builds early in the development cycle, these builds may contain bugs that might be painful for some. If you take this flight, you won’t be able to switch back to the Fast or Slow rings without doing a clean-install on your PC and starting over.

If you are looking for a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring – head on over to Flight Hub. You can also check out the rest of our documentation here including a complete list of new features and updates that have gone out as part of Insider flights for the current development cycle.

General changes, improvements, and fixes for PC

  • Windows Sandbox now supports configuration files! These files allow users to configure some aspects of the sandbox, such as vGPU, networking and shared folders. A blog post to explain this new feature is available here.
  • Windows Sandbox now captures hotkeys in full screen.
  • We fixed an issue where Windows Sandbox would not start on localized builds.
  • We’ve done some work to improve error reporting in Windows Sandbox. Now the error dialog includes the error code and a link to the Feedback Hub.
  • We fixed an issue where Windows Sandbox was unexpectedly throwing an error due to referencing a deleted file under Windows.old.
  • We fixed an issue where if you unpinned groups from Start, apps might end up thinking their tiles were still pinned.
  • We fixed a recent issue where if you hid the search icon in the taskbar, a number of win32 apps would unexpectedly redraw when opening the Start menu.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the Search pane becoming truncated if launched after rotating the device orientation from horizontal to vertical.
  • We fixed an issue where Settings would sometimes crash when opening “Advanced Display Settings” from Display Settings.
  • We fixed an issue where it wasn’t possible to add a drive to the list of folders to exclude when setting up Enhanced Search in Settings.
  • We fixed an issue where there were unexpected characters in the text under the Storage Sense listing for temporary files.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in certain games no longer rendering UI updates (appearing visually stuck) after using Alt + Tab to quickly switch away and back to the game.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the taskbar blinking if an AC adapter was attached when the device had less than 20% battery.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the taskbar disappearing for a second when dismissing Start/Cortana/Search on a secondary monitor.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in File Explorer potentially hanging when trying to rename, delete, or move MKV files in the recent flights.
  • We fixed an issue that could cause Windows logon to forget the last logged on user, and instead would display the sign-in prompt for the default user from the list after dismissing the lock screen.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in CDPUserSVC using an unexpectedly large amount of CPU for prolonged periods of time.
  • We fixed an issue where the newly added popup window shadows might unexpectedly stop appearing after using your PC for some time.
  • We fixed an issue impacting UWP apps resulting in entries under a “…” that launched other apps not working after the first time the secondary app was launched.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the left and right arrows on the touch keyboard inserting 4 and 6, respectively, in certain languages.
  • We fixed an issue resulting in the game bar record and broadcast options unexpectedly not working in recent builds.
  • We fixed an issue impacting Emoji Panel and Clipboard History reliability.
  • We fixed an issue in Ease of Access’s Cursor and pointer settings, mouse pointer size and color are now retained on upgrade. There is a remaining issue with mouse pointer showing white color instead of the selected color after signing out and signing back in.
  • When using the Magnifier with larger pointers, it pans smoothly as the pointers change shape.
  • We fixed an issue where navigation mode on Orbit braille display could not be changed.
  • We fixed an issue where Narrator paused unexpectedly when reading through a PDF.
  • [ADDED] We fixed the issue that required an additional reboot when performing Reset this PC and selecting Keep my files on a device that has Reserved Storage enabled.

Known issues

  • Launching games that use anti-cheat software may trigger a bugcheck (GSOD).
  • While we’ve done some work to improve night light reliability in this build, we’re continuing to investigate issues in this space.
  • Some Realtek SD card readers are not functioning properly. We are investigating the issue.
  • In Windows Sandbox, if you try to navigate to the Narrator settings, Settings app crashes.
  • Mouse pointer color might be incorrectly switched to white after signing out and signing back in.
  • Creative X-Fi sound cards are not functioning properly. We are partnering with Creative to resolve this issue.
  • You may experience an increase in Start menu reliability issues on this build – a fix will be included in the next flight.

Known issues for Developers

  • If you install any of the recent builds from the Skip Ahead and switch to either the Fast ring or the Slow ring – optional content such as enabling developer mode will fail. You will have to remain in the Fast ring to add/install/enable optional content. This is because optional content will only install on builds approved for specific rings.

No downtime for Hustle-As-A-Service,
Dona <3

The post Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18841 appeared first on Windows Blog.

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February 22, 2019 at 01:09PM

WordPress 5.1 “Betty”

WordPress 5.1 “Betty”

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A Little Better Every Day

Version 5.1 of WordPress, named “Betty” in honour of acclaimed jazz vocalist Betty Carter, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard.

Following WordPress 5.0 — a major release which introduced the new block editor — 5.1 focuses on polish, in particular by improving the overall performance of the editor. In addition, this release paves the way for a better, faster, and more secure WordPress with some essential tools for site administrators and developers.

Site Health

With security and speed in mind, this release introduces WordPress’s first Site Health features. WordPress will start showing notices to administrators of sites that run long-outdated versions of PHP, which is the programming language that powers WordPress.

When you install new plugins, WordPress’s Site Health features will check them against the version of PHP you’re running. If the plugin requires a version that won’t work with your site, WordPress will keep you from installing that plugin.

Editor Performance

Introduced in WordPress 5.0, the new block editor continues to improve. Most significantly, WordPress 5.1 includes solid performance improvements within the editor. The editor should feel a little quicker to start, and typing should feel smoother.

Expect more performance improvements in the next couple of releases.


Developer Happiness

Multisite Metadata

5.1 introduces a new database table to store metadata associated with sites and allows for the storage of arbitrary site data relevant in a multisite / network context.

Cron API

The Cron API has been updated with new functions to assist with returning data and includes new filters for modifying cron storage. Other changes in behavior affect cron spawning on servers running FastCGI and PHP-FPM versions 7.0.16 and above.

New JS Build Processes

WordPress 5.1 features a new JavaScript build option, following the large reorganisation of code that started in the 5.0 release.

Other Developer Goodness

Miscellaneous improvements include:

  • Updates to values for the WP_DEBUG_LOG constant
  • New test config file constant in the test suite, new plugin action hooks
  • Short-circuit filters for wp_unique_post_slug(), WP_User_Query, and count_users()
  • A new human_readable_duration function
  • Improved taxonomy metabox sanitization
  • Limited LIKE support for meta keys when using WP_Meta_Query
  • A new “doing it wrong” notice when registering REST API endpoints

…and more!


The Squad

This release was led by Matt Mullenweg, along with Gary Pendergast as Senior Code Reshuffler and Poet. They received wonderful assistance from the following 561 contributors for this release, 231 of whom were making their first ever contribution! Pull up some Betty Carter on your music service of choice, and check out some of their profiles:

0x6f0, 1265578519, 1naveengiri, 360zen, aardrian, Aaron Jorbin, Abdullah Ramzan, Abhay Vishwakarma, Abhijit Rakas, Achal Jain, achbed, Adam Silverstein, Ajit Bohra, Alain Schlesser, aldavigdis, alejandroxlopez, Alex, Alex Shiels, Alexander Botteram, Alexandru Vornicescu, alexgso, All, allancole, Allen Snook, Alvaro Gois dos Santos, Ana Cirujano, Anantajit JG, Andrés, Andrea Fercia, Andrea Gandino, Andrea Middleton, andrei0x309, andreiglingeanu, Andrew Duthie, Andrew Lima, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Nevins, Andrew Ozz, Andrey Savchenko, Andy Fragen, Andy Meerwaldt, Angelika Reisiger, Antal Tettinger, antipole, Anton Timmermans, Antonio Villegas, antonioeatgoat, Anwer AR, Arun, Ashar Irfan, ashokrd2013, Ayesh Karunaratne, Ayub Adiputra, Barry Ceelen, Behzod Saidov, benhuberman, Benoit Chantre, benvaassen, Bhargav Mehta, bikecrazyy, Birgir Erlendsson, BjornW, Blair jersyer, blob, Blobfolio, bobbingwide, boblinthorst, Boone Gorges, Boro Sitnikovski, Brad Parbs, Bradley, bramheijmink, Brandon Kraft, Brandon Payton, Brent Swisher, Brian Richards, bridgetwillard, Brooke., bruceallen, Burhan Nasir, Bytes.co, Caleb Burks, Calin Don, campusboy, carolinegeven, ccismaru, chasewg, Chetan Prajapati, Chouby, ChriCo, chriscct7, Christopher Spires, claudiu, Clifford Paulick, Code Clinic, codegrau, coleh, conner_bw, Corey McKrill, croce, Csaba (LittleBigThings), Cyrus Collier, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel James, Daniel Koskinen, Daniel Richards, Daniele Scasciafratte, danimalbrown, Danny Cooper, Danny de Haan, Darko A7, Darren Ethier (nerrad), Dave Pullig, David A. Kennedy, David Anderson, David Binovec, David Cramer, David Herrera, David Lingren, David Shanske, David Stone, dekervit, Denis Yanchevskiy, Dennis Snell, designsimply, dfangstrom, Dhanendran, Dharmesh Patel, Dhaval kasavala, Dhruvin, DiedeExterkate, Dilip Bheda, dingo_d, Dion Hulse, dipeshkakadiya, Dominik Schilling, Donncha O Caoimh, dontstealmyfish, Drew Jaynes, Drivingralle, drywallbmb, dschalk, dsifford, eamax, eArtboard, edo888, edocev, ElectricFeet, Ella Van Durpe, Eric Andrew Lewis, Eric Daams, Erich Munz, Erick Hitter, ericmeyer, etoledom, Evan Solomon, Evangelos Athanasiadis, ever, everyone, Faisal Alvi, Felipe Elia, Felix Arntz, Fernando Claussen, flipkeijzer, Florian TIAR, folio, FPCSJames, Frank Klein, frOM, fuchsws, fullyint, Gabriel Maldonado, Gareth, Garrett Hyder, Gary Jones, Gennady Kovshenin, Gerhard Potgieter, Girish Panchal, GM_Alex, gnif, graymouser, greg, Grzegorz (Greg) Ziółkowski, Guido, GutenDev, Hafiz Rahman, [email protected], Hans-Christiaan Braun, Hardeep Asrani, Hardik Amipara, Harsh Patel, haruharuharuby, Heather Burns, Helen Hou-Sandi, Henry Wright, Herre Groen, hitendra, Hitendra Chopda, Ian Belanger, Ian Dunn, ibantxillo, Ignacio Cruz Moreno, Igor, Igor Benic, imath, ionvv, Irene Strikkers, isabel104, ishitaka, Ivan Mudrik, J.D. Grimes, Jack Reichert, Jacob Peattie, James Nylen, janak Kaneriya, janalwin, Janki Moradiya, janthiel, Jason Caldwell, javorszky, Jaydip Rami, Jayman Pandya, Jb Audras, Jeff Farthing, Jeffrey de Wit, Jeffrey Paul, Jennifer M. Dodd, Jenny, Jeremey, Jeremy Felt, Jeremy Herve, Jeremy Pry, Jeremy Scott, Jesper V Nielsen, Jesse Friedman, Jimmy Comack, Jip Moors, Jiri Hon, JJJ, joanrho, Job, Joe Bailey-Roberts, Joe Dolson, Joe Hoyle, Joe McGill, Joel James, Joen Asmussen, John Blackbourn, John Godley, johnalarcon, johnpgreen, johnschulz, Jonathan Champ, Jonathan Desrosiers, joneiseman, Jonny Harris, Joost de Valk, Jorge Costa, Joseph Scott, JoshuaWold, Joy, jpurdy647, jrdelarosa, jryancard, Juhi Patel, Julia Amosova, juliemoynat, Juliette Reinders Folmer, Junaid Ahmed, Justin Sainton, Justin Sternberg, Justin Tadlock, K.Adam White, kapteinbluf, keesiemeijer, Kelly Dwan, kelvink, khaihong, Kiran Potphode, Kite, kjellr, kkarpieszuk, kmeze, Knut Sparhell, konainm, Konstantin Obenland, Konstantinos Xenos, kristastevens, krutidugade, laghee, Laken Hafner, Lance Willett, laurelfulford, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, leemon, lenasterg, lisannekluitmans, lizkarkoski, Luca Grandicelli, LucasRolff, luciano, Luminus, Mário Valney, maartenleenders, macbookandrew, Maja Benke, Mako, mallorydxw-old, Manuel Augustin, manuel_84, Marc Nilius, marcelo2605, Marco Martins, marco.marsala, Marcus Kazmierczak, marcwieland95, Marius L. J., mariusvw, Mariyan Belchev, Mark Jaquith, Mathieu Sarrasin, mathieuhays, Matt Cromwell, Matt Gibbs, Matt Martz, Matthew Boynes, Matthew Riley MacPherson, mattyrob, mcmwebsol, Mel Choyce, mensmaximus, mermel, metalandcoffee, Micah Wood, Michael Nelson, Michiel Heijmans, Migrated to @sebastienserre, Miguel Fonseca, Miguel Torres, mihaiiceyro, mihdan, Mike Gillihan, Mike Jolley, Mike Schroder, Milan Dinić, Milan Ivanovic, Milana Cap, Milind More, mirkoschubert, Monika Rao, Monique Dubbelman, moto hachi ( mt8.biz ), mrmadhat, Muhammad Kashif, Mukesh Panchal, MultiformeIngegno, Muntasir Mahmud, munyagu, MyThemeShop, mzorz, nadim0988, nandorsky, Naoki Ohashi, Naoko Takano, nataliashitova, Nate Allen, Nathan Johnson, ndavison, Ned Zimmerman, Nextendweb, Nick Diego, Nick Halsey, Nick Momrik, Nick the Geek, Nicolas Figueira, Nicolas GUILLAUME, Nicolle Helgers, Nidhi Jain, Niels Lange, Nikhil Chavan, Nilambar Sharma, Noam Eppel, notnownikki, odyssey, Omar Reiss, Omkar Bhagat, on, others, Ov3rfly, Paal Joachim Romdahl, palmiak, panchen, parbaugh, Parham Ghaffarian, Pascal Birchler, Pascal Casier, Paul Bearne, Paul Biron, Paul Paradise, Paul Schreiber, Perdaan, Peter Putzer, Peter Wilson, Petter Walbø Johnsgård, Pierre Saïkali, Pieter Daalder, Piyush Patel, poena, Pramod Jodhani, Prashant Baldha, Pratik K. Yadav, Pratik K. Yadav, precies, Presskopp, Presslabs, PressTigers, programmin, Punit Patel, Purnendu Dash, qcmiao, Rachel Baker, Rachel Cherry, Rachel Peter, Rafsun Chowdhury, Rahul Prajapati, Raja Mohammed, Ramanan, Rami Yushuvaev, Ramiz Manked, ramonopoly, RavanH, redcastor, remyvv, rensw90, rhetorical, Riad Benguella, Rian Rietveld, Richard Tape, Ricky Lee Whittemore, Rinku Y, Rishi Shah, Robbie, robdxw, Robert Anderson, Robin Cornett, Robin van der Vliet, Ryan McCue, Ryan Paul, Ryan Welcher, ryotsun, Sébastien SERRE, Saša, sagarnasit, Sami Ahmed Siddiqui, Sami Keijonen, Samuel Wood (Otto), sarah semark, Sayed Taqui, Scott Lee, Scott Reilly, Sean Hayes, Sebastian Kurzynoswki, Sebastian Pisula, Sergey Biryukov, Shamim Hasan, Shane Eckert, Sharaz Shahid, Shashwat Mittal, Shawn Hooper, sherwood, Shital Marakana, Shiva Poudel, Simon Prosser, sjardo, skoldin, slilley, slushman, Sonja Leix, sonjanyc, Soren Wrede, spartank, spyderbytes, Stanimir Stoyanov, Stanko Metodiev, stazdotio, Stephen Edgar, Stephen Harris, stevenlinx, Storm Rockwell, Stoyan Kostadinov, strategio, Subrata Sarkar, Sultan Nasir Uddin, swift, Takahashi Fumiki, Takayuki Miyauchi, Tammie Lister, Taylor Lovett, teddytime, Terri Ann, terwdan, tharsheblows, the, ThemeZee, Thomas Patrick Levy, Thomas Vitale, thomaswm, Thorsten Frommen, Thrijith Thankachan, Tiago Hillebrandt, tigertech, Tim Havinga, Tim Hengeveld, Timmy Crawford, Timothy Jacobs, titodevera, Tkama, to, Tobias Zimpel, Tom J Nowell, TomHarrigan, Tommy, tonybogdanov, Tor-Bjorn Fjellner, TorontoDigits, Toshihiro Kanai, Towhidul Islam, transl8or, Ulrich, upadalavipul, Usman Khalid, Utsav tilava, uttam007, Vaishali Panchal, Valérie Galassi, valchovski, vishaldodiya, vnsavage, voneff, warmlaundry, wbrubaker, Weston Ruter, who, Will Kwon, William Earnhardt, williampatton, wpcs, wpzinc, xhezairi, Yahil Madakiya, Yoav Farhi, Yui, YuriV, Zane Matthew, and zebulan.

Finally, thanks to all the community translators who worked on WordPress 5.1. Their efforts bring WordPress 5.1 fully translated to 34 languages at release time, with more on the way.

If you want to follow along or help out, check out Make WordPress and our core development blog.

Thanks for choosing WordPress!

Drew’s Business

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February 21, 2019 at 05:57PM

Getting to know the Windows update history pages

Getting to know the Windows update history pages

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At Microsoft, our vision for transparency is what drives us to create extensive documentation for every audience. We believe our documentation should reflect the needs of our customers and range from “get started” guides for our various products and solutions to guidance around specific issues that customers may encounter—for example, when updating Windows devices to solve stability issues and protect against the latest security vulnerabilities. While we’ve talked about the guiding principles for monthly Windows 10 quality updates, it’s important to know that we have specific documentation on what is included in each of those updates and why and how you should install them.

That documentation can be found on the Windows 10 update history page. Despite what the name suggests, the update history page is not a single page, but rather a collection of pages, one for every Windows update we release. Each page offers detailed information about each update, such as the type of update, which operating system versions it affects, improvements and fixes and how to get the update.

Whether you are an IT pro responsible for your organization, or a consumer working with your personal device, we recommend that you bookmark the Windows 10 update history page as there you’ll be able to:

  • Learn about the latest improvements and fixes included in the update.
  • See if an update resolves an issue that may have affected your experience.
  • Understand why your device isn’t receiving the latest and greatest Windows update.
  • Find out proactively if there are known issues associated with an update and see if there is a workaround and timing for resolution.

Using the Windows 10 update history page

Finding the Windows 10 update history page is easy. You can bookmark the direct link to the page, or search for “Windows 10 update history page” on the web.

When you first arrive on the Update History page, you will see a view much like this:

Windows 10 update history page

To find the “home” page for a specific version of Windows (e.g. Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019), look at the list located on the top left. If you’re looking for details about that feature update, you can skip the rest of the steps; you’re where you need to be. If you’re looking for information about a specific quality update; however, simply select the desired update from the bottom left.

How to find details on feature and monthly updates

Windows 10 version “home” pages

Beginning with Windows 10, version 1809, we incorporated active tracking of known issues into the Windows 10 update history “home” page for each version. This information includes:

  • Compatibility blocks. Certain hardware configurations may inhibit a successful upgrade due to compatibility issues which must be resolved.
  • Issues under investigation. Whenever open issues change, or new issues are identified, they can be found here along with their current status

These pages also contain notices, pointers to product roadmaps, FAQs, and other relevant information regarding other Microsoft products, such as Surface or Office 365.

Monthly quality update pages (aka “release notes”)

The monthly quality update pages, or “release notes” for short, contain information pertaining to the content of each quality updates, including:

  • Improvements and fixes. While not an exhaustive list (as each update can often include more than 100 fixes), you’ll find information on fixes that solve high impact issues.
  • Known issues. When there is an issue that may impact users should they install an update, we offer details on these issues to help you determine whether it’s in your best interest to install the update or wait for the update containing a fix.
  • How to get the update. We link to the installation packages from the Microsoft Update Catalog and offer relevant information about installation as well as a link to a list of all altered files in that update.

History of the Windows update history page

Prior to our decision to provide Windows as a service, updates came in the form of a single patch solving a single problem. While this model allowed administrators to pick and choose which problems to solve and, therefore, prioritize testing more relevant patches, it resulted in a growing divide between the devices we tested internally (which had all of the latest patches installed) and the device used by our customers (which had a variety of patches installed or not installed). This fragmentation leaked into our documentation. Each individual patch had its own Knowledge Base (KB) article, creating a large quantity of patch-related pages and making it difficult to find the KB article for a specific patch. With the implementation of Windows as a service, we have been able deliver a single article covering all fixes and improvements in a given update, reducing redundancy and making it far easier for you to find and search for the information you need.

After the first few cumulative updates for Windows 10, we received positive feedback on consolidating the information we offer around updates and made the decision to bring our learnings to legacy operating systems. We started by creating Security-only Updates and Previews of Monthly Rollups for Windows 7, utilizing a similar packaging method to that used for Windows 10. This allowed us to, in turn, vastly simplify our documentation and eventually create an update history page for each currently supported version of the Windows operating system:

Little known facts about the Windows update history pages

Now for a few interesting facts:

  • The Windows Update history documentation is localized in 36 languages, and garners extensive use: the Windows 10, version 1809 page alone presently has over 1 million-page views and counting!
  • On average, Microsoft releases 58 new or updated articles a month for the Windows platforms. We coordinate with other Microsoft teams to share best practices that will help ensure that the information we provide is accurate and consistent for our customers.
  • Users can provide feedback on the update history pages and Microsoft will take action on that feedback.

We’re listening. Actively.

We read every comment you leave on our update history pages. Your feedback is critical to helping us build a better product and experience for our customers.

Here are a few of our recent comments:

  • “I’m 85 and I’ve been able to get rid of the blue screen but now my cursor freezes up what do I next?”
  • “Current update is taking over 30 minutes, & computer is still 0% complete”
  • “I have latest iCloud and latest Windows 10. Using Office 365 Outlook, I still cannot sync my calendar and contacts.”
  • “After the last update to windows 10, everything worked great as if it was a completely new install. The next day when I restarted my computer it reverted to the way It was before the update where some programs would not start.”
  • “Nothing to do, everything is perfect”

Examples like these help us identify trends and build better documentation. Further, it allows us to pass along this feedback directly to our engineering and customer support teams such that they can use this information in their planning processes, and to improve your experiences with future updates and versions of Windows.

We appreciate your comments and hope that you will continue to leave us actionable feedback. To leave us comments, simply click the Yes or No button at the bottom up the update history page and you’ll see the following:

how-can-we-improve.PNG

What’s next?

We are always looking to improve our experiences, and our documentation experience is no different. We are currently looking at new ways to present data that’s more relevant to the way that you use Windows. For instance:

  • Adding a section that specifies the value for each monthly update so that you are aware of the benefits in consuming each update.
  • Exploring how to better provide updates on known issues so you can more easily identify when workarounds are available, or when they have been resolved.

More importantly, though, we’d like to hear from you. How can we improve our transparency further? If you currently use the update history pages, how do you use them? If you haven’t used them before, how can we make them a more compelling resource?

If you have the time, please complete the relevant survey below. We look forward to your feedback and are excited for the opportunity to improve your update experience.

take-the-survey.png

Work

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February 21, 2019 at 09:40PM

Resources for Microsoft Live Events in Stream, Teams and Yammer

Resources for Microsoft Live Events in Stream, Teams and Yammer

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During a customer onsite today, we discussed some of the different ways to deliver a Microsoft Live Event to increase internal employee engagement. There are three primary ways to engage customers in a Live Event. The first is directly through Microsoft Stream which provides a rich set of options around presentation, encoders, etc.. The second method using Microsoft Teams provides the simplest and quickest path to delivering rich, multi-presenter capable, webcasts. Finally, Live Events can also be instantiated within the context of a Yammer Group for large corporate broadcasts with built in Yammer interactions.

I promised the customer when I left them that I would provide documentation and step by step training around how to deliver using each of these methods. The following is that documentation and I thought I might share here as well.

Happy Webcasting! – Michael Gannotti LinkedIn | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Microsoft Live Events Resources:

Work

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February 21, 2019 at 01:09PM

Starting a Small Business? This $20 Class Will Teach You How to Help It Thrive.

Starting a Small Business? This $20 Class Will Teach You How to Help It Thrive.

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Barry Moltz shows students how to establish profitable, sustainable ventures across 15 hours of content.

Drew’s Business

via Entrepreneur https://ift.tt/1qEhOCr

February 21, 2019 at 09:39AM